menu

50th anniversary gala

IT’S BEEN A LONG PANDEMIC. We are excited to bring people together for an in-person evening that will emphasize the importance of trusted research and constructive dialogue in an increasingly complex policy environment. The primary purpose of the gala is to celebrate the IRPP’s 50th, allow an opportunity for networking, and to raise funds for a dedicated fellowship.

The gala festivities will kick off with a late afternoon panel discussion among prominent Canadians on whether the federation is equipped – from fiscal and governance perspectives – to face major national challenges like public health emergencies, the transition to a net-zero economy and public safety threats. A networking reception will immediately follow the panel, and lead into the gala dinner.

Over the course of the evening, we will award a prize to recognize a Canadian researcher who has done an exceptional job in increasing the public’s understanding of a key public policy issue. Another award will go to the post-secondary student who wins our public policy op-ed writing contest.

WHY ARE WE RAISING FUNDS?
Funds raised from the dinner will go toward establishing an annual fellowship for a researcher who identifies as Black, Indigenous or of colour. One of the IRPP’s strategic priorities is to foster a more inclusive public policy dialogue in Canada. This fellowship will help us to encourage early-to-mid-career racialized researchers and amplify their work and profiles. Partners will be recognized annually for their support of the fellowship.


To book your tickets, and to discuss customized visibility agreements and individual opportunities please contact Suzanne Ostiguy McIntyre at 514-787-0740 or smcintyre@nullirpp.org. For more information, download the IRPP 50th Anniversary gala sponsorship matrix (PDF).

Building climate resilience

June 2021’s “heat dome” sent temperatures in many parts of British Columbia into the mid-40s, contributing to the deaths of just under 600 people. Wildfires that consumed the town of Lytton followed. Then in November the “atmospheric river,” with its intense rainfall, created massive flooding that destroyed sections of crucial road and rail infrastructure, cutting off the most populous part of BC from the rest of Canada and forcing the evacuation of communities in the Fraser Valley’s Sumas Prairie, the town of Merritt and several First Nations.

With $9 billion and counting in infrastructure damage, loss of life, livelihoods and livestock, BC has joined the legions of other jurisdictions that have been significantly affected by our changing climate.

While BC has one of Canada’s most ambitious policy packages to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions with “CleanBC’s Roadmap to Net Zero,” climate adaptation policy is playing catchup.

New initiatives and funding have been promised by federal and provincial governments, but is there a robust policy agenda that incorporates best practices gleaned from adaptation research, local knowledge and experience that will reduce the risk of catastrophic losses to communities and the environment?

Engage with our panel of climate adaptation experts, who will discuss the policies and practices that will be needed to build climate resilience.

Panelists and moderator to be confirmed.


This event is offered free of charge.

Registration soon – stay tuned!

Early bird: please contact Judy Manny at jmanny@nullirpp.org to reserve your place online or in person.


This talk is part of the IRPP’s 50th anniversary event series, What should be on Canada’s policy radar?  Held throughout the spring and fall of 2022, these panel discussions will help us to identify the challenges that our decision-makers will face in the coming years, and examine ways in which Canada can promptly address these issues.

Rapid changes and transformations: The future of Canada’s energy transition

Countries around the world are increasing their ambition on climate policy, and low-carbon technologies across a range of sectors are reaching maturity. This is creating the conditions for rapid change in the energy system and, as a major producer and exporter, Canada will be particularly impacted. Policy-makers must prepare for a period of volatility, as systems make the necessary transformation to a low-carbon future. While the end-state is becoming clearer, the transition will be marked by volatility in energy markets. It will require policies that can manage the legacy systems that dominate today as well as support the development of new energy systems.

Panelists and moderator to be confirmed.


This event is offered free of charge.

Registration soon – stay tuned!

Early bird: please contact Judy Manny at jmanny@nullirpp.org to reserve your place online or in person.


This talk is part of the IRPP’s 50th anniversary event series, What should be on Canada’s policy radar?  Held throughout the spring and fall of 2022, these panel discussions will help us to identify the challenges that our decision-makers will face in the coming years, and examine ways in which Canada can promptly address these issues.

What does the future of Indigenous governance look like?

Many aspects of Indigenous nation-building in Canada remain underexplored, despite the significant political and policy implications. But change is happening from within. This panel will consider how Indigenous communities are identifying what is important and what is relevant to them, so they can make these critical changes.


This event is offered free of charge.

Registration soon – stay tuned!

Early bird: please contact Judy Manny at jmanny@nullirpp.org to reserve your place online or in person.


This talk is part of the IRPP’s 50th anniversary event series, What should be on Canada’s policy radar?  Held throughout the spring and fall of 2022, these panel discussions will help us to identify the challenges that our decision-makers will face in the coming years, and examine ways in which Canada can promptly address these issues.

Housing challenges and the rural-urban divide

As the fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic made the realities of urban life more and more uncomfortable, city-dwellers from across Canada traded in high-rise condos in densely packed neighbourhoods for farmhouses in the countryside. As a result, Canadians in more rural areas have seen rising costs in housing and related issues. Should smaller communities try to do something to combat the influx of come-from-away’ers? Or does a move from urban to rural signal a new opportunity for new collaborations and a shift in the balance of power? Join us for a panel discussion with housing experts from in and around Halifax as we unpack the challenges that have emerged in the past years.

Panelists and moderator to be confirmed.


This event is offered free of charge.

Registration soon – stay tuned!

Early bird: please contact Judy Manny at jmanny@nullirpp.org to reserve your place online or in person.


This talk is part of the IRPP’s 50th anniversary event series, What should be on Canada’s policy radar?  Held throughout the spring and fall of 2022, these panel discussions will help us to identify the challenges that our decision-makers will face in the coming years, and examine ways in which Canada can promptly address these issues.

The future of national security in the world of the “n-block war”

In the late 1990s, the US Marine General Charles Krulak came up with the concept of the “Three Block War” to illustrate the complex spectrum of challenges likely to be faced by soldiers on the modern battlefield. The idea was that the future of warfighting would be in urban environments in failing states, where soldiers might be doing humanitarian assistance in one block, peacekeeping in another, and actual combat in another.

With the “Freedom Convoy” of truckers, followed quickly by the Russian invasion of Ukraine in late February 2022, we are witnessing the rise of what we can call the “n-block war,” a multi-dimensional combat environment that sees the collapse of the traditional distinctions between  soldier and civilian, state and nonstate actors, information operations and news reporting, mercenaries and insurgents, all of it thrown into, and mediated by, the constantly shifting and evolving real-time information environment.

This panel will look at the future of national security in the world of the n-block war, addressing questions such as: How should we prepare? What should we prioritize? With whom should we ally?


This event is offered free of charge.

Registration soon – stay tuned!

Early bird: please contact Judy Manny at jmanny@nullirpp.org to reserve your place online or in person.


This talk is part of the IRPP’s 50th anniversary event series, What should be on Canada’s policy radar?  Held throughout the spring and fall of 2022, these panel discussions will help us to identify the challenges that our decision-makers will face in the coming years, and examine ways in which Canada can promptly address these issues.

Democracy under threat? Polarization and public policy in Canada

Over the past two decades, we’ve seen a growing trend toward political polarization around the globe. On the face of it, Canadians seem to have largely sidestepped this trend, especially compared to our American neighbours.

But the country may not be as aligned as it seems. According to recent studies, Canadians have different views of the world depending on where they live. They are increasingly divided on correct responses to COVID and other policies. And they have increasingly negative views of those who do not agree with their political views.

How divided are we, really? Are our political, economic and geographic differences sowing seeds of discontent? And if so, what can policymakers to do to push back against a trend toward increasing polarization? On March 30, 2022 at 4 p.m. we held an event where we discussed the impact of polarization on public policy. (Additional panelists to be confirmed.)

Video


This talk is part of the IRPP’s 50th anniversary event series, What should be on Canada’s policy radar?  Held throughout the spring and fall of 2022, these panel discussions will help us to identify the challenges that our decision-makers will face in the coming years, and examine ways in which Canada can promptly address these issues.


Held in collaboration with:

The puzzling persistence of racial inequality in Canada

A special event as part of the IRPP’s 50th anniversaryyear activities

We’re celebrating our 50th anniversary this year. For 30 of those years, France St-Hilaire has been a pivotal figure in reinforcing the Institute’s reputation as a trusted source of independent, bilingual, public policy research in Canada.  

On the occasion of France’s retirement, we have organized a special lecture in her honour. The lecture, entitled “The puzzling persistence of racial inequality in Canada,” will be delivered by Queen’s University Professor Emeritus Keith Banting and Debra Thompson, the Canada Research Chair in Racial Inequality and Democratic Societies at McGill University. Their remarks will explore why Canada’s robust welfare state – which includes universal health care and myriad employment and training programs – as well as a race-neutral immigration selection system, official multiculturalism and the Charter have not been able to mitigate racial economic inequality.

A reception will follow the lecture.

To register, please contact Judy Manny, jmanny@nullirpp.org. The event is free of charge and in-person only. Limited seating is available.  

Health tech: The politics and policies of remote rehabilitation

This discussion considered how during the pandemic there has been a proliferation of new health technology initiatives that allow for remote rehabilitation outside of a formal clinic setting. Using the case studies of respiratory and reproductive care, the discussion will blend academic, policy and entrepreneurial perspectives to identify policy priorities related to responsible innovation and the commercialization of homegrown health tech.

Video


This talk is part of the IRPP’s 50th anniversary event series, What should be on Canada’s policy radar?  Held throughout the spring and fall of 2022, these panel discussions will help us to identify the challenges that our decision-makers will face in the coming years, and examine ways in which Canada can promptly address these issues.

“Gouvernance inclusive et dĂ©mocratie Ă  l’heure de la polarisation”

This panel discussion focused on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on already existing cleavages in Canadian society. Our panellists will discuss the following issues: What is the role of social media in the development and spread of conspiracy theories? How has the pandemic affected political partisanship? Now that we have faced two years of the pandemic, how robust is confidence in our political institutions? And we know the pandemic is exacerbating inequalities, especially in marginalized communities, but has it increased solidarity with these populations?

Note that the event was held in French.

Video


This talk is part of the IRPP’s 50th anniversary event series, What should be on Canada’s policy radar?  Held throughout the spring and fall of 2022, these panel discussions will help us to identify the challenges that our decision-makers will face in the coming years, and examine ways in which Canada can promptly address these issues.